Kelly Wearstler + Lee Jofa = A Match Made in Fabric Heaven

The glam L.A. designer shares the inspiration behind her five most popular patterns for the storied fabric house.

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Courtesy of Kelly Wearstler

Designing a fabric line takes a lot more than meets the eye—after all, the same fabric that looks good on a sofa has to be able to translate to drapery. To help in this endeavor, powerhouse fabric companies have long turned to interior designers to license textile collections for them, with one of the most successful collaborations to date being Kelly Wearstler’s lines for Lee Jofa.

Lee Jofa creative director Stephen Elrod told Museumvillage that the brand will be launching Wearstler’s fifth collection for them in early 2020, which will feature new colorways of one of her all-time most popular patterns, Graffito. “Lee Jofa has enjoyed an incredibly successful relationship with Kelly over the course of the past decade,” Elrod says. “She is never content to stay the course in her designs and colors but is always looking forward to new points of inspiration for her collections. Kelly’s use of bold, graphic, colorful designs, inspired by her varied interests in travel, architecture, art, and fashion, sets her apart among her peers in the world of interiors.”

Wearstler debuted her first collection for Lee Jofa 11 years ago this fall, at a time when she was having trouble finding what she needed in the marketplace. “It is amazing to have an extensive custom collection of fabrics at your fingertips that will suit the various interiors and outdoor spaces you are envisioning for clients,” she says. But when asked to pick her favorite, Wearstler demurs: “My favorite patterns are graphic, or those that have subtle nuances and organic anomalies. But I’m also a fan of repetition and symmetry in scale. I can’t choose just one! It’s the application that makes a pattern truly sing in a space.”

Here are the five designs from her line we love the most, and the inspiration behind them.

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    1 Graffito
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    Courtesy of Lee Jofa

    One of Wearstler’s most popular patterns was inspired by a Gio Ponti drawing she saw at a museum.

    2 Mineral
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    Courtesy of Lee Jofa

    This pattern is reminiscent of stones, indicative of the fine line Wearstler walks between the raw and the refined.

    3 Bengal Bazaar
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    Courtesy of Lee Jofa

    This is, of course, an ikat—but Wearstler style!

    4 Channels
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    Courtesy of Lee Jofa

    The lines on this velvet are intentionally casual, representing Wearstler’s interest in street art and expressive design.

    5 Crescent
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    Courtesy of Lee Jofa

    A nod to the Art Deco movement, this painterly design can be used indoors or out.

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